Avignon.

Tips for your trips. Tourist information. Official websites.

Avignon is the prefecture of the Vaucluse department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region. Between 1309 and 1377, during the Avignon Papacy, seven successive popes resided in Avignon and in 1348 Pope Clement VI bought the town from Joanna I of Naples. Papal control persisted until 1791 when, during the French Revolution, it became part of France.

Also сheck оut мore info: See the essentialMuseums & Exhibitions

The historic centre, which includes the Palais des Papes (map), the cathedral and the Pont d’Avignon (map), became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995. The medieval monuments and the annual Festival d’Avignon have helped to make the town a major centre for tourism.

Avignon is on the left bank of the Rhône river, about 580 km (360 mi) south-east of Paris, 229 km (142 mi) south of Lyon and 85 km (53 mi) north-north-west of Marseille.

The city teemed with activity and building as architects, builders, artists flocked to the town. At that time, within the city walls there were over 100 churches and chapels – many of which have been transformed since then into everything from shops to a movie theatre! The wealth and activity generated by the presence of the papacy spilled out into the region, so that even small villages nearby boast a rich architectural past.

The city walls (map), built by the popes in the 14th century and still encircle Avignon. They are one of the finest examples of medieval fortification in existence. The walls are of great strength and are surmounted by machicolated battlements flanked at intervals by 39 massive towers and pierced by several gateways, three of which date from the 14th century.

Calvet Museum (map), so named after Esprit Calvet, a physician who in 1810 left his collections to the town. It has a large collection of paintings, metalwork and other objects. The library has over 140,000 volumes.

Musée du Petit Palais (map) at the end of the square overlooked by the Palais des Papes, has an exceptional collection of Renaissance paintings of the Avignon school as well as from Italy.

 

Public transport.

Guide to traveling to and getting around in France.

PEM Avignon – public transport

Also сheck оut мore info: GETTING HERE (avignon-tourisme.com) • Getting to France (uk.france.fr)

BUS: sobus.travel — sells bus tickets for all the bus companies. OuibusIsilinesFlixBusEurolinesMegabus >> (*Intercity buses in France)

TRAIN: Trains are a great way to get around in France. For regional trains, schedules can be found at ter.sncf.com. You can get from pretty much anywhere to anywhere else by train.

For long distances, use the TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse, or High-speed train) on which reservations are obligatory. TGVThelloOuigo. + RailEurope • EurostarThalysizy (Paris-Brussels) • TGV Lyria (Switzerland) • DB (Germany) • RENFE (Barcelona) >> (*Rail travel in France)

AIRPORT: parisaeroport.fr – Paris airport information. The main international airport, Roissy – Charles de Gaulle, is likely to be your port of entry if you fly into France from outside Europe.

FERRY: Brittany FerriesP&O FerriesDFDS Seaways

Avignon tourisme, créateur d’expériences.

A 2h40 de Paris, 1 heure de Lyon ou 30 mn de Marseille en TGV, nichée au cœur de la Provence, Avignon est dotée d’un patrimoine historique unique et bénéficie d’une offre culturelle exceptionnelle en toute saison…

Vivante, vibrante, étonnante, insolite et plurielle, Avignon, est une escapade de choix dont on se souvient longtemps. Laissez-vous gagner par la douceur de vivre de la cité des papes !

video source: Avignon Tourisme / youtube.com /

Useful websites.

Links to additional resources with useful information for planning your trip.

VISAS & IMMIGRATION.

How do you obtain a VISA for a stay in France – and what are the customs procedures? + Customs and Visas (france.fr)

ABOUT-FRANCE.COM.

The practical travel and tourist information pages on Paris, French regions, driving in France, and a whole lot more.

FRANCE-VOYAGE.COM.

France-Voyage.com is a leading guide to Tourism in France. It provides holidaymakers with all the practical and cultural information.

guide.michelin.com: Find your next great culinary experience with the MICHELIN Guide.

France-Voyage.com: Since it was created in 2003, France-Voyage.com has developed over the years to become a leading guide to Tourism in France. It provides holidaymakers with all the practical and cultural information they need to help plan their stay.

About-France.com – is a website filled with hundreds of pages of relevant and useful information about France. The practical travel and tourist information pages on Paris, French regions, driving in France, and a whole lot more, are just part of a much wider exploration of modern France.

Le Figaro: This is a French newspaper that covers news, culture, and entertainment in France, and provides practical information for tourists on topics such as food, wine, and shopping.

Auto Europe: This website provides information on car rental options in France, as well as booking options and practical information on driving in France.

Velib: This is the website of Paris’ public bike-sharing system and provides information on renting bikes, pricing, and station locations.