Nantes.

Tips for your trips. Tourist information. Official websites.

Nantes is the capital of the north-western French region of Pays de la Loire. Nantes has strong historical connections with the adjoining region of Brittany, and is the historical capital of the region (though it has not been its official capital since the days of Napoleon).

Also сheck оut мore info: See & DoEventsTickets

Nantes’ cityscape is primarily recent, with more buildings built during the 20th century than in any other era. Several 15th- and 16th-century half-timbered houses still stand in Le Bouffay (map), an ancient area corresponding to Nantes’ medieval core which is bordered by Nantes Cathedral (map) and the Castle of the Dukes of Brittany (map). The large, Gothic cathedral replaced an earlier Romanesque church.

The Psallette (map), built next to the cathedral about 1500, is a late-Gothic mansion. The Gothic castle is one of Nantes’ chief landmarks.

Place du Commerce (map). This is the centre of the city and everybody will be able to direct you here. Near here you will find la Place Royale (map), le Quai de la Fosse, la rue Crébillon (famous for its posh shops, map).

Île de Versailles (map). An island in the river Erdre close to the city centre (reach it from Tram line 2). The entire island is a Japanese garden and is a pleasant place to relax.

Nantes has several museums. The Fine Art Museum (map) is the city’s largest. Opened in 1900, it has an extensive collection ranging from Italian Renaissance paintings to contemporary sculpture. The museum includes works by Tintoretto, Brueghel, Rubens, Georges de La Tour, Ingres, Monet, Picasso, Kandinsky and Anish Kapoor.

The Historical Museum of Nantes, in Château des ducs de Bretagne (map), is dedicated to local history and houses the municipal collections. Items include paintings, sculptures, photographs, maps and furniture displayed to illustrate major points of Nantes history.

Nantes is a very bike-friendly city. There are bicycle lanes alongside most major roads, demarcated by green arrows, and many small streets and trails that are only accessible to pedestrians and cyclists.

 

Public transport.

Guide to traveling to and getting around in France.

TAN – Public transport.

Also сheck оut мore info: TRANSPORTATION (nantes-tourisme.com) • Getting to France (uk.france.fr)

BUS: sobus.travel — sells bus tickets for all the bus companies. OuibusIsilinesFlixBusEurolinesMegabus >> (*Intercity buses in France)

TRAIN: Trains are a great way to get around in France. For regional trains, schedules can be found at ter.sncf.com. You can get from pretty much anywhere to anywhere else by train.

For long distances, use the TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse, or High-speed train) on which reservations are obligatory. TGVThelloOuigo. + RailEurope • EurostarThalysizy (Paris-Brussels) • TGV Lyria (Switzerland) • DB (Germany) • RENFE (Barcelona) >> (*Rail travel in France)

AIRPORT: parisaeroport.fr – Paris airport information. The main international airport, Roissy – Charles de Gaulle, is likely to be your port of entry if you fly into France from outside Europe.

FERRY: Brittany FerriesP&O FerriesDFDS Seaways

10 Reasons to visit Nantes, France.

Nantes is the 6th largest city in France, and a popular city to visit for tourists. It is located in north-western France, only 50 km from the Atlantic Ocean along the river Loire. In this video we give you 10 reasons to visit Nantes including Château des Ducs de Bretagne, Les Machines de L’ile, Passage Pommeraye, Place Royal, Place Graslin and much more.

video source: allthegoodies TRAVEL / youtube.com /

Useful websites.

Links to additional resources with useful information for planning your trip.

VISAS & IMMIGRATION.

How do you obtain a VISA for a stay in France – and what are the customs procedures? + Customs and Visas (france.fr)

ABOUT-FRANCE.COM.

The practical travel and tourist information pages on Paris, French regions, driving in France, and a whole lot more.

FRANCE-VOYAGE.COM.

France-Voyage.com is a leading guide to Tourism in France. It provides holidaymakers with all the practical and cultural information.

guide.michelin.com: Find your next great culinary experience with the MICHELIN Guide.

France-Voyage.com: Since it was created in 2003, France-Voyage.com has developed over the years to become a leading guide to Tourism in France. It provides holidaymakers with all the practical and cultural information they need to help plan their stay.

About-France.com – is a website filled with hundreds of pages of relevant and useful information about France. The practical travel and tourist information pages on Paris, French regions, driving in France, and a whole lot more, are just part of a much wider exploration of modern France.

Le Figaro: This is a French newspaper that covers news, culture, and entertainment in France, and provides practical information for tourists on topics such as food, wine, and shopping.

Auto Europe: This website provides information on car rental options in France, as well as booking options and practical information on driving in France.

Velib: This is the website of Paris’ public bike-sharing system and provides information on renting bikes, pricing, and station locations.